Techie validation

I met with a group of teachers this morning who signed up to be on the building technology committee. Past meetings in this circle focused on the conversations of the district technology team which, from what I experienced, delved into kinds of tech, policy and such. This isn’t to say the conversation wasn’t good, but it left me wanting more.

I know lead the building tech committee and as the leader I have to have a very clear vision of where the school will head with technology. The building principal has given me leeway to make decisions and do as I need to. A good leader has to have a vision first and I envision a school where staff and students have a netbook that allows them full time access to resources, but I also see the pedagogy changing dramatically as learning moves away from rote teaching practices to flexible practices that allow and expect kids to make meaning of what they are reading within the digital learning landscape. This kind of shift is radical because it asks teachers to completely change how they teach and how they approach learning. Learning should be understood as kids learning and their own learning. This said, technology will play a prominent roll because it is the knife that will carve out this new way of teaching and learning leaving behind outdated practices that rely solely on the teacher being the focal point of education to the teacher as being facilitator.

I had a striking conversation with a colleague about this very topic. Today’s kids are technologically far beyond most teachers. They are social networkers who converse online or through a camera making connections whenever they can and this is NORMAL to them. It is no big deal to use the iPod and Facetime or Skype. It is no big deal to start to make apps and distribute them. Soon, it will be no big deal to exist in a completely different space interacting, learning, responding, working, and socializing with ease. Can educators help kids do this? Will we stand in the way of their learning? How will we respond to this kind of learning? Hmmm, not sure.

What I do know is that what I am teaching kids today will help them tomorrow. Not only am I helping them learning cool, new Web 2.0 technologies, but I am helping them think through how to approach using all of it. There is a constant conversation about the learning process, setting your own expectations, and carrying a relevant conversation orally and digitally. Without the constant chatter, the kids lose focus and it devolves into a mess of “why am I even doing this,” thinking leading to a debased sense of learning and ownership.

So, I am much more than the tech guy. I combine high quality teaching methods with technology to expand what kids are learning and thinking about. It is this method of teaching that helps students to see a computer is much more than gadgets and fun. It really is about learning, problem solving, decision making, and learning how to learn. That last phrase, learning how to learn, is the hardest of all for students. They are so cultured to get everything from the teacher that they do not know how to get it (learning) for themselves.

I have evolved my teaching practices and pedagogy to meet the demands of a digital world where information is easy to access. The shift took some time for me, but I got there.